PRESS RELEASE EDMONTON SLUT WALK 2014

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April 30 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The fourth annual Slut Walk Edmonton

MAY 31st 12:00PM at WILBERT MCINTYRE PARK (8331 104 St)

SLUTWALK HITS EDMONTON

On January 24th, 2011, a representative of the Toronto Police gave shocking insight into the mentality of victim-blaming women who were targets of sexual assault by saying: “women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized”. In response to this comment, a global movement was born. Slut Walk.

The first Slut Walk occurred on Sunday, April 3, 2011 in Toronto and quickly went viral with walks occurring across North America and in countries around the globe: Australia, Denmark, Finland, New Delhi, Argentina and Morocco among many, many others.

Here in Edmonton, we are celebrating our fourth year in pushing out the message that there’s nothing a person can ever do to deserve sexual violence. We have a line-up of amazing speakers: Danielle Boudreau, Junetta Jamerson, Jaqueline Fayant and musical artist Sierra Carter Jamerson. Our diverse group of speakers come from communities who are often under-represented in the conversations around sexual violence.

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Last year, hundreds took to the streets to walk with us, and we are anticipating an even larger turn out this year. People of all gender expressions and sexual orientations are welcome to take part, as the walk is about making a unified statement about sexual assault and victims’ rights, and a demand for respect for all.

Backgrounder:

On Twitter @yegslutwalk or #YEGSlutWalk

Website: www.yegslutwalk.com

In Canada 50% of women will experience physical and or sexual violence in their lifetime and women, who are Indigenous, women of colour, sex workers, trans, or differently-abled face even higher rates of victimization. Because of prevalent gender roles, men and boys who face victimization and sexual assault are often ignored or laughed at because it is assumed that they always want sex.

Rape culture or a rape-prone world describes a culture where sexual violence is normal and prevailing attitudes, norms, and behaviours excuse, minimize, and even propagate sexual violence. Sexual violence happens often. It is misrepresented. It is not taken seriously. Consent Ed has a great section on rape myths.

Femifesto Media toolkit: reporting on sexual assault

Photos:

Stephanie Chard by Tyler Mckay

Jason Garcia and Nicki Anderson by Tyler McKay

For media/interview requests:

 

Danielle Paradis (@daniparadis, Dani.paradis2@gmail.com)

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